‘Lord Ferguson, where have you been?’ Rashford writes farewell message on behalf of Ferguson; social media futility thesis rears its head again

“Twitter (social media) is a waste of life.

Former Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson’s quote is proving to be true once again. It’s amazing how far ahead of the game Ferguson was when he said this. Once again, a famous athlete has had an “accident” on social media to prove the phrase.

This time, it was the novelty of “proxy messages”. This time, it was a novelty: a proxy message. Marcus Rashford sent an “affectionate goodbye” to David de Gea on social media after he left the club after 12 years as their starting goalkeeper. However, it turns out that the message was not written by Rashford himself, but by a “proxy,” and has been mocked and criticized by fans.

“Rashford deleted his farewell message to De Gea when he realized something was amiss,” the Mirror reported on Sept. 9 (ET). It’s an interesting case. It’s an interesting case because it shows how high-profile athletes are now using social media.

De Gea has been United’s first-choice goalkeeper since 2011, but he eventually left the club due to age-related decline in performance. Negotiations to extend his contract were unsuccessful. His contract ended on June 30, and the club announced his departure on its official website on June 8.

Although he hasn’t been in the best of form in recent years, De Gea has been one of the best goalkeepers in the EPL. He was also responsible for many moments of glory for United, which led to an outpouring of affectionate goodbye messages from his teammates. Rashford was among them. Rashford posted a picture of De Gea hugging him on social media, with the caption: 토토사이트 “You’ve been with me all my life. Good luck with the next step. Brother,” he wrote.

The problem was, it wasn’t Rashford’s own message. It didn’t take long to find out. The message was prefaced with the words “Cation ideas: (Suggested phrases)”. This suggests that either Rashford used ChatGPT, an artificial intelligence, or a third party managing Rashford’s social media accounts used ChatGPT to generate the message to De Gea. In either case, Rashford didn’t write the message himself.

High-profile athletes are often known to hire people to manage their social media accounts. Mistakes can happen in this process. In the past, Gary Neville has spoken out about players hiring companies to manage their social media accounts. They should manage it themselves. It’s about independence and credibility. It’s about their own voice, not someone else’s voice,” he said.

After all, Rashford didn’t even write a simple goodbye sentence himself, relying on someone else or an AI to do it for him. When fans pointed this out, Rashford quickly deleted the message. But it was too late. The damage had been done.

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